Saturday, August 02, 2008

The American clothier: Martin Greenfield, Adrian Jules, Jack Taylor

The clothier is an interesting animal, commonly encountered in mid-sized and large American cities. He serves a useful purpose I think. The clothier occupies that middle position between a trained tailor and a pure salesman on the retail floor. Given enough experience and a good eye, he is well positioned to dispense advice and serve as the face for a true bespoke and/or a made-to-measure (MTM) tailoring business. Chances are he will be a member of the Custom Tailors & Designers Association of America.

Martin Greenfield in Williamsburg, Brooklyn


Martin the Tailor from Ed David on Vimeo

This is a recent documentary on the remarkable story and background of Martin Greenfield and GGG Clothiers.

John Vanderbrook of Adrian Jules in Rochester, NY



At 3:33 in the video clip, Vanderbrook discusses the pattern cutting method at Adrian Jules. Notice the hybrid use of a human to draft the pattern, a CAD system to store, modify and print out customer patterns and a human to cut the cloth on the pattern. If I am not mistaken, this is the same hybrid approach Nedo Bellucci Napoli uses.

Jack Taylor of Beverly Hills

The documentary Jack Taylor of Beverly Hills premiered a couple of years ago at the Santa Barbara Film Festival but I have yet to find a clip of it online. In lieu of that, here is a YouTube clip of the opinionated Mr. Taylor. Incidentally, similar to Greenfield, Taylor also got started in the clothing business by working at GGG Clothiers.

Update: It appears the filmmakers of Jack Taylor of Beverly Hills have a new website with three video clips and stills from the documentary.

Additional links
- Styleforum thread on a MTM fitting at Martin Greenfield
- Custom Tailors & Designers Association of America

2 comments:

Nelson Chen said...

Jack Taylor of Beverly Hills is on Netflix streaming.

sleevehead said...

Great, thanks Nelson for the tip. The proliferation of media outlets is pretty amazing. Between Google Books, Hulu, Netflix, blogs and plain old libraries, it's getting easier to become more knowledgeable about clothes.